Thursday, June 30, 2016

Massive Arms for You, Part Eight - Joe Weider (1956)




THE BASIC PRINCIPLE OF SPECIALIZATION


In bodybuilding, specialization means devoting more attention to one part of the body than to any others. To do this, you must exercise that part when your energy is at its highest point so that you can extend yourself fully when working that part.

Every bodybuilder knows that at the start of his workout, when he is fresh and raring to go, he trains with great enthusiasm and displays his greatest energy and power. As the workout proceeds, he grows a little tired and it is not unusual for a bodybuilder to dislike certain exercises which are situated close to the end of this program -- not because of the exercises themselves, but because he is fatigued by the time he reaches them and is thinking more of getting the workout over and done with than of the benefit the exercises can bring him.

Being that this is true, one basic principle of specialization is to exercise the part being specialized on when you are fresh and full of energy.

This can be accomplished in two ways. If you train three times a week on an all around, full body routine, then do your specialization exercises FIRST, one right after the other for the part being specialized on, and complete all of these specialization exercises first before going on to the rest of your workout.

If you prefer using a split method of training, then you are to exercise the part you are specializing on, in this case your arms only on one day. The next day you work the balance of your body, then back to your arms the next day and so on until you have taken the four, five, or six workouts for that week.

In this way, even if you train six days per week, when you do perform your arm specialization your arms are fresh and your training energy high.

The split method of training is preferred by many advanced bodybuilders. It is not advisable for those who have not had at least a full year of consistent training experience, for it can prove to be a quite severe method of training. For anyone who has less than a full year's experience, or for ANYONE who has tested and found out that training more than three times a week does not suit his temperament, training three times and placing the specialization exercises first in the workout is best.

Another basic principle of specialization is the truth that after any muscle is strenuously exercised it must have a suitable period of rest to recuperate, to rebuild and to grow in. Therefore, if your aim is to increase the size of a body part, you must have at least one day of rest between exercise periods. If you want to REDUCE any part, then training more often will do that, for by exercising a body part every day there is never any chance for complete muscle recuperation. You break down more than can be rebuilt. Then, the part decreases in size. Such training is fine for losing weight and body size, but bad for increasing size.

I believe now you are beginning to see the light and starting to understand why I stressed the point of basic principles as I did. For now you can see how one bodybuilder, using a certain set of specialized arm exercises  three times a week can gain in arm size, while another can use these same exercises six times a week and lose size. The exercises are the same. The method of performance is the same. Yet on gains and another loses. It was not the exercises, but the BASIC PRINCIPLES which were responsible!

Of course there is more to it than just that, and I'll have much more to say about the matter before we are through. But I do believe that if you've been following me carefully, things are now beginning to add up.

To sum up the general basic principle of arm specialization, you are to make certain that you exercise the arms when they are most fresh; either first in a general workout or else on entirely separate days. If you are training for greater size, you must rest one full day between training sessions. If you are looking for a decrease in size, you train more frequently, BUT -- whether you want to get larger arms or smaller ones, do the exercises when you are most fresh and able to work them most strenuously.

And now, with this general specialization information behind us, let me tackle the individual phases, and principles which govern them.



BASIC PRINCIPLES OF BULK SPECIALIZATION
And Sample Routines
 
The basic principle behind bulk specialization is to make the muscles work hard, to flush them up fully, but -- without too heavy a drain on the overall energy.

While this may seem contradictory, the HEAVIER weight you use, and up to a certain point, the LESS REPETITIONS you perform, provided that these low repetitions do flush up the area, the LESS ENERGY YOU WILL SPEND! 

Sounds impossible? But it's true. Make the test yourself. Take a light barbell and perform the standing press with it. The weight should be light, but still heavy enough that you really have to force out the last 4 or 5 of those many repetitions, so that when you place the weight back down you really couldn't squeeze out another repetition. Now, how do you feel? I'll tell you -- there's a good chance that not only are your arms so fatigued that you can raise them above your head, but you may also find your knees shaking and about the only thing you want to do is to find a place to sit down and rest. But, don't do that. Rest a minute and then perform another set of this same exercise with this same weight, just as many repetitions as possible (*JAMRAP - acronym patented). Now, how do you feel? Terrible? Ready to call it quits and take your shower? Maybe even a little sick to the stomach and shaky all over? You should, for you've really drained your energy and it will be hours before you'll feel good again.

Now, after you've recuperated from your ordeal, in a few days or so, make this test. Load up a heavy weight, one you can only press overhead about 6 times. Perform those 6 repetitions and be fair -- make that you have to squeeze out the last 2 or 3. Now put the weight back on the ground. How do you feel? Full of pep? Your arms feel light as feathers? You aren't the least bit tired? Good! Then rest a minute and take this same weight and perform another set of as many repetitions as you can do. Why, man alive -- you make 8 repetitions instead of 6, and easier than the first set. And how do you feel? Great! Raring to go for more! You don't want to sit down, you're just getting started. Come on, where's those heavy weights! 

The above isn't make believe. It's the truth. And if you make the test you'll discover I'm right. Heavy weights, low repetitions, therefore DO NOT drain the energy. Light weights, high repetitions do. Remember that when training for bulk.

And now, how about flushing up the muscles, which is another basic principle of bulk training? Will low repetitions do this as well as high? Will low repetitions do this as well as high? The answer is not only yes-- but more emphatic than that, for heavy weights, low repetitions, will flush up the muscles in a way that high repetitions never can. Here's why:

The muscles of our bodies are composed of body tissues or muscle fibers. All muscles have depth and this depth is caused by strands of fibers piling up, one on top on another with some fibers being close to the skin and others more deeply embedded, until, as in the case of the upper arms, some of the fibers are actually resting against the humerus, or upper arm bone.

If you will refer to a previous section of this book, you will see that I said that the uppermost fibers were called into play first, and then, only with continued muscular activity do the more deeply embedded fibers, or muscle cells lend a helping hand.

Now, when you perform high repetitions, you get the upper fibers to work and as you keep pounding out the repetitions the ones next in line get to work. But -- long before you can reach those which are really deeply embedded your energy gives out. Not so much because of actual muscular inability to continue the exercise, but more due to body exhaustion. Your strength hasn't given out as much as your endurance.

And, even if you do continue to train on high repetitions and increase your endurance so that you can perform more repetitions your muscles still won't grow. For, while you may be able to work the muscles a little harder when you can perform more repetitions, you still will not be using any real muscle power and the muscle fibers close to the surface of the skin will learn to adjust themselves and in time be able to handle the load to the limit of your endurance.

If endurance exercises favorably encouraged muscle growth, a long distance runner would of course possess tremendous legs. Instead, by bodybuilding standards, such legs are very lean.

Now, lets see what happens when you use low repetitions and heavy weights. The first set of the exercise you use real strength. Your muscles are worked hard. You tear down surface tissue. But you are really not tired. So after a short rest you can perform another set of the same exercise.

While you have been resting, even momentarily, blood has been rushed to the muscles by the circulatory system to nourish the body part and to cleanse away the remains of body cells which have been utilized during the exercise.

Now, because you are still strong, your energy high and not depleted as it might have been after performing high repetitions, you can easily perform another set of the same exercise. But, because the body has not yet had enough time to replace and repair the muscle cells already used, more deeply embedded muscle tissue must work at your strength command. Then, once again during your short rest, more blood rushes to the area. A third set and even a fourth, fifth and sixth are entirely possible when you follow the low repetition and heavy weight principle in bulk training, and with each set you reach deeper and deeper tissue and more and more blood rushes to the area to start repairing and cleansing away muscle cells. Obviously, the part becomes intensely flushed up. You still aren't actually tired, though of course your muscles won't be as fresh as they were at the start. But -- you certainly will feel none of the overall exhaustion you do from high repetitions. And -- most important of all, you've reached the deeply lying muscle cells, made them work, and when they are rebuilt during rest, they will be stronger and larger. Then you use that extra strength to handle even heavier weights, and up and up both your strength and muscle size will go!

The acquisition of greater strength, then, is another basic principle for arm bulk. Strength cannot be built up in too many directions at once. Nature simply cannot function in that manner. Which brings me to another little known basic principle as related to arm bulk training.

You must NOT perform too many different exercises for any particular bulk arm routine. It is better to include only a few, for by doing so you can more easily build up your strength in these few and reach a high power-level as compared to performing many exercises. Weightlifters, in their specific lifts, are always superior to bodybuilders in poundages they can lift. They develop this unusual power from concentrating on only a few movements. Bodybuilders may be superior to weightlifters on overall athletic performance, but this point has never been proved nor disproved, so I will not take a stand there. But, everyone will agree that, in their few specific lifts, the weightlifter can outperform the bodybuilder.

This same principle holds true in arm training. If you include too many different exercises you will never hit your strength peak in any that you do, and will not flush up the muscles as fully as you might with the greater poundages achievable when concentrating on fewer exercises. The result will be that they will not grow as large and as strong as they otherwise could.

Therefore, for the purpose of bulk arm training [principles applicable to all body parts], it is entirely practical to perform as few as one exercise for the biceps, one for the triceps, and one for the forearms. If each of these three exercises is concentrated on, and every effort made to handle as heavy poundages as possible for low repetitions and up to 6 sets each, then a peak of power and a maximum of flushing will soon result in the muscles. And the arms will grow. Of course, after a month or two a change should be made in the routine to work the muscles from a different angle so that other cell areas will get their load of work and this will result in still further growth and power.

I mentioned before that there is no single BEST arm exercise. There is no one exercise that will develop all the muscle fibers of the biceps to a maximum. If there were, our bodybuilding job would be less complex. Likewise there is no one exercise that will develop the triceps to its entirety, not any one that will mold forearms to perfection. Each do a part of a job only! You need variety and regular changes in training to develop large upper arms without any flaws.

There is another variation of bulk arm training, which also works well, and which may be preferred by many, since it permits more variety in any single workout.

Instead of performing only one exercise for the forearms, one for the biceps and one for the triceps, you can perform two for each. However, in doing so and still not to violate the principle of building up a maximum flushing action by developing maximum power, the two exercises for the part are to be very similar. The best way to do this is to perform an exercise with a barbell and then a very similar one with dumbbells. In this way you do get a change of pace, but you still stick fast to the basic principle of bulk training.

Naturally, when this is done you do not perform as many sets of each exercise. You sensibly cut them in half, performing 3 sets of the barbell version and 3 sets of the dumbbell version. You keep the number of repetitions the same as though you were performing 6 sets of one exercise.

Getting back once again to the flushing principle . . . for best results perform your upper arm exercises first. Start with either the biceps or else the triceps, this is not too important. But, do not directly exercise the forearms until all the upper arm exercises have been done!

Concerning the repetitions you are to perform in a bulk arm program . . . from 6 to 8 each set for the upper arms, and from 12 to 15 for the forearms is generally best. The forearms, due to their tendonous construction, need slightly higher repetitions to flush up, and they must be given them if they are to strengthen and grow.

If, combined with such bulk arm training you also train the rest of the body in a like manner, you set up a pattern of favorable body growth which will make it easier for all body parts to grow.

You must obtain a minimum of 8 hours sleep and eat nourishing weight gaining foods, along with ample quantities of high protein or else you will not gain the maximum benefit from your training.

And now, to give you some sample layouts for you to follow in your bulk arm routines. Remember, I am merely giving you a few samples. You are to test them if you wish, or else you can use them as your guide, refer to the exercises listings previously given in this book, and then select other exercises which I have stated as being good for bulk and flushing, if you prefer. You don't even have to stop here. For while those I specified as being best for bulk and flushing have been proven to meet the requirements of most individuals, this still doesn't say that other exercises given won't bulk up your arms, if the more typical bulk and flushing exercises do not. Remember what I said about each of us being individuals and each reacting differently to some extent to exercise. I know what has proved effective in the vast majority of cases. But -- you may be an exception. Just as long as you keep the basic principles of training for arm bulk intact, you can experiment and try any combination of exercises you want, if yours happens to be a stubborn case, one which does not respond according to normal.


SAMPLE ARM BULK ROUTINES

A fine arm bulk routine is as follows: 6 sets, about 8 repetitions a set of the cheating barbell curl; 6 sets of 8 reps lying barbell triceps curl; and 6 sets of 15 reps seated barbell wrist curl. All exercises are naturally performed for a maximum of flushing and heavy weights are used.

Another good bulk routine consists of 6 sets of 8 reps bench press; sets of about 8 reps alternate dumbbell curl; and 6 sets of 15 reps leverage bell standing wrist twist.

As you can see from the above, it really makes no difference if you start with the biceps first or the triceps. Some bodybuilders like to flush up the biceps first and others prefer starting with the triceps. It is much a matter of personal likes. However, there is a pattern which you can follow which may be helpful and that is to perform the exercise in which the HEAVIEST weight is used first. In the first sample routine the cheat curl was the heaviest weight and the routine was started with that. In the second sample routine the bench press was the heaviest weight so this was done first. This is not an absolute rule, and experienced bodybuilders often violate it. But, whether consciously or else merely because of past experience, I've found that a great many champions do start their training with the exercise in which they use the heaviest weight, so you might follow that plan first. If it agrees with you then follow that pattern in all your training.

Now, if you want more variety in your training and prefer more than just a few exercises, then here are a few sample routines which each include 6 exercises. 

Start off with the seated dumbbell curl, 3 sets of about 8 reps. Follow this with the front of chest dumbbell curl for 3 x 8. Then, perform 3 x 8 of the flat bench triceps curl with one dumbbell in two hands, and then 3 x about 8 in the one arm standing triceps press. You then start on the forearms with the seated barbell wrist curl for 3 x 12-15 or so, then 3 x 12-15 of the standing wrist twist with a leverage bell.

The actual number of repetitions should remain flexible, within certain limitations. If, as you proceed in set after set of an exercise you find that you can only perform 5 repetitions instead of 6 to 8 for the upper arms, don't worry about it just as long as you do flush up he upper arms. Sometimes you may find that the second set of an exercise is actually easier than the first, because the muscles are more warmed up, along with your mindset, and you might if you really try be able to squeeze out 10 reps instead of the usual 6 to 8. If this is the case, do so -- just as long as you pump the muscles up. The forearms are the same. You may find that as you grow tired you can only do a few less repetitions than usual. Don't worry about it just as long as the forearms do become pumped up. And, if you find for some reason you can do more, do so -- just as long as your forearms experience a real flushing up.

NEVER -- under any circumstances become static and exercise in an absolutely fixed pattern. You must learn to know yourself and to make minor adjustments, workout to workout. That's one of the greatest secrets of training success and one used by all experienced lifters. They do the same exercises that everyone else does, but they inject their physical and mental personalities into each workout and think nothing of breaking certain rules just as long as they keep basic principles intact -- which as far as training for arm bulk is concerned means rather few different exercises, heavy weights, and a maximum of flushing effect. Do that, and your arms will have to grow!

The four sample programs which have just been listed will give you a guide to your own exercise arrangement when striving for bulk. Use the routines as set down if you want. Or else, merely use them as a key. And then, pick out similar exercises and similar programs which you think may fit you better. Only trial and a certain amount of error will give you the real experience you need to gain fully developed arms. But, stick essentially to the basic principles and think more of these than the actual exercises you perform and you'll soon be closer to your goals than you may now think.

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Massive Arms for You, Part Seven - Joe Weider (1956)





GET READY FOR ACTION

So far in this course I've been doing all the work. Now, the time has come for a more even distribution of labor, so keep your training togs handy; you'll need them soon. 

If that's Joe Weider writing I'll eat my Protein From The Sea.

Charles A. Smith? 
You bet. 

I don't blame you if you're itching to get started on some of the more than 70 basic exercises and the hundreds of variations of these I've outlined. But -- just using these exercises without knowing WHY or HOW will give you a pair of mighty sore arms, but not much else.

Obviously, you can't just pick out any exercises that might strike your fancy and then expect them to give you massive arms. But, you can be sure that there is a time and an appropriate place for each one of the exercises and their many variations. And that, I propose to tell you now.

First, you and I must settle one important point, and this is -- are you really ready for arm specialization? The chances are that you don't quite know for sure. You want to get bigger arms, of course. If you didn't you wouldn't be reading this book.
So, will arm specialization do you any real good at this time? Here's how you can tell. If you've had at least a year of regular training with a good course of instructions then you are advanced enough to benefit from specialized arm work. If you have had less than that length of consistent proper training then you will be wise to merely study this book, but to hold off following any of the routines in it until you have had the required minimum experience. 

Don't forget, even on a rather general course, your arms are definitely not being neglected. Many of the exercises I've listed are likely quite familiar to you already. 

However, the time element in itself is not the complete guide. While it is true that after a year's proper training experience you should be advanced enough to specialize on the arms, or any other part of the body for that matter, this still doesn't mean that such specialization is needed by you. Therefore, here is another condition you should obey. Besides making sure that you've been training properly for at least a year on a good all around general program, DO NOT begin to specialize on the arms unless the course you are presently following has ceased to make them grow. In other words, if your arms are still growing satisfactorily, don't make any change in their training. 

This is only common sense, for the test of the worth of any course is RESULTS! Just as long as you are getting results from any course DO NOT make a change, regardless of how long you may have been on the course. Only AFTER improvement ceases for a few weeks can you be certain that you've outgrown the productiveness of the course for now, and only then should you make a switch. I hope that point is completely clear.

And now, let us presume that after carefully reading the foregoing you decide you are ready to specialize on your arms. What should you do? 

Make up your mind what you immediate arm training goal is. In other words, decide WHAT YOU WANT AND NEED MOST. Is it more bulk, greater definition, improved proportion, or an increase in power? 

Only you know exactly what you want, so only you can make the decision. But, once you do make up your mind, train only for the one, major purpose you have picked out. Select exercises and routines devised to produce that result, and don't split up your training, following a bulk course one day, a definition course the next, a power course the third and a muscle proportioning course the next.

To gain maximum benefit from any routine you must stick to it for a least a reasonable amount of time. Then, if you find that the results you are getting from that type of training aren't giving you the kind of arm you want most, you can always change to another program.

As you advance in arm training and gain more experience, your aims are bound to change from time to time. Even great champions like Ross, Reeves and Stephan train for bulk for a time, then after their arms are somewhat bulkier they may change to a definition course, or one for power. Your ideals will change as you progress in the game, and thanks to this book you well be able to satisfy your varying needs.

When specializing on your arms, if at all possible, try to make your training of them conform with your general training ideas. This is one training principle which is frequently overlooked and I'll explain it in greater detail now.

If you decide that your arms need more bulk more than anything else, then besides following a bulk arm routine try to follow a bulk routing for the rest of the body too. If you do this your arms will grow more easily, for by eating more heavily of weight gaining foods, and doing all around exercises which are conductive of bodyweight gains, you set up a pattern of growth receptiveness within the body, which helps to add inches to your arms.

More of interest on this subject:
http://ditillo2.blogspot.ca/2009/04/gain-weight-to-build-your-arms-john.html

If the contrary is true, and that despite your bodybuilding experience your arms are still flabby and generally overweight, you'll acquire definition faster if besides following definition arm exercises you also watch your diet to eliminate fattening foods, eat generously of high protein foods and generally train for definition of the entire body. Then a cycle of harder muscularity is set up inside the body and you acquire muscularity faster.

This same is true when it comes to power, or improved symmetry. Always try to set your arm goal and your overall bodybuilding goal in the same channel. If you do this, there will be no conflicting elements, no working at cross purposes. Physically and psychologically you'll be attuned to one major bodybuilding goal, even though you may be concentrating on your arms.

Of course, this may not always be completely possible. There will be some who will, by necessity, have conflicting arms. A bodybuilder who began greatly overweight may have reduced satisfactorily in all body parts except his lower abdomen and hips. Then he will have to strive for further reduction of these two areas, even though he may want to make his arms grow as well.  Other bodybuilders who began training very thin may have experienced very rapid arm growth during their first few months of training, and because of this their arms could be slightly fleshy while the rest of their bodies are still comparatively lean. In such cases, it might be more practical for them to train the arms for greater definition and at the same time work the rest of the body on a general bulk routine.

These are the exceptions, but I know that they do exist. However, in time, as they continue in their bodybuilding, even these exceptions will equalize their development and then they too will be able to train with one major bodybuilding goal in mind; the same one which conforms with their arm aims.

So, if right now, due to developmental flaws you cannot follow the principle I have just outlined, then train as you must for the time being. But don't forget the secret I've just revealed. Sooner or later you will have to follow it to acquire the arms of your dreams.

And now we've reached the moment you've been waiting for -- your graduation day so to speak, when you can at at last put into actual practice some of the knowledge you have acquired in this book so far. You still have a great deal more to learn, you'll find that as we go along. But -- you can start getting into your training clothes for that first Big Arm workout isn't too far off now.   


ARE THERE ANY SECRET EXERCISES?

The basic principles behind arm specialization are simple, once they are understood. One of the first that you must remember is that there is NO SINGLE BEST ARM EXERCISE, OR ROUTINE, FOR THAT MATTER, THAT WILL WORK 100% FOR EVERYONE. 

Each one of us is an individual, and as such is controlled to some extent by our temperament, structural build and even heredity. This in no way implies that if you happen to be of a different temperament or structural build compared to some champion that you cannot be as successful in your training as he. But, it does mean that the precise routines he follows, the number of sets, reps, arrangements of the exercises, frequency of training and so on which brings him such great success might only bring you mediocre results.

This is one of the big truths and also one of the major perplexities of bodybuilding. And yet, it is not too difficult for you to solve.

You will have to discard some of your old theories, perhaps, for what I am now going to relate is somewhat revolutionary and has never been included in any bodybuilding work before.

Therefore, right now, you are to forget about actual exercises and routines, as such, and concentrate instead on BASIC PRINCIPLES. 

To clarify this, permit me to elaborate. You know, and I know, that when we come right down to it there are no secret exercises. Some of the arm movements which I've included in this work, and some of the variations, may be new to you. But that is only because you haven't had enough bodybuilding experience to have become acquainted with them all. Certainly all of them, or at least a major part of them are known to all advanced bodybuilders.

And yet, even in the cases of advanced bodybuilders, ones who use many, or even all of the exercises in this book from time to time in their training, will have variances of arm size and quality. Why? Because those who succeed the best do not think of exercises as such. They do not think, "Now I am going to do the cheating barbell curl. And then I will do an alternate dumbbell curl. After which I shall perform a flat bench triceps curl with two hands, because these movements are among the best known for flushing up the upper arms." 

No, they do not think in that matter at all. What they do think, follows: -- "I want more bulk on my upper arms. Therefore I will use exercises which have been proven as being good for bulk and then train with these exercises using the BULK PRINCIPLES so my arms will grow."

Do you see the difference? In one case, the individual relies on the exercises to bulk up his arms. In the other, he combines both exercise and BASIC PRINCIPLES. And that is what makes the difference.

The man who relies on exercises alone never gets as far as he should. The one who combines exercise with basic principles reaches his top form.

I make this point clear so that you can understand why it should be an injustice to you, if in this chapter I were merely to set down a few routines and say, "Do these exercises in the order listed for the number of sets and repetitions given and you will acquire bulk." Of if I did the same thing for definition, power, and so on. The routines would work in some cases, but not in all. And I will only be satisfied with this course if EVERYONE reading it and putting its advice into practice DOES SUCCEED and develop more massive, powerful and muscular arms!

In the previous chapters, when I explained the many arm exercises, I gave you an idea of what each was best for -- such as bulk, power, high biceps, contraction, isolation, etc. When you arrange your own arm routines use this as your KEY and select exercises from those listed which according to my explanations fit your present arm needs.

Then you will be certain that you have selected exercises which suit purpose best. But, once the selection is made, cease thinking of them as exercises in the strict sense. Merely consider them as the TOOLS YOU WILL USE FOR THE APPLICATION OF THE BASIC PRINCIPLES which governs your specific aims.

It may remain up to you to actually arrange the very best routines for your purpose. I'm going to give you help, of course. But you can see that it would be impossible for me to set down EVERY routine that is possible with a combination of more than 70 basic exercises and hundreds of variations. A slight change in sets, repetitions, arrangement of the exercises , and an entirely new routine would have to be explained. I am not a mathematician, but I can easily guess that if I attempted such an impossible task it could easily run up to several hundred thousands of routines. And even if I did list them all you might still not find the one that suited YOU best, UNLESS you also managed to incorporate the BASIC PRINCIPLE I have been harping on in this chapter.

But -- once you know these basic principles, and are given a few sample routines to follow, then with a little experimentation on your part you can arrive at your own formula which will make those arms you desire yours.

Basic principles are therefore, all important. Actual exercises must be secondary. Learn that lesson well. It will be the most important one you will ever learn in your gaining of bodybuilding knowledge.

And now, just what are those basic principles I've made so much out of in this chapter and how do you apply them. Our next chapter will clarify everything.


Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Two Different Deltoid Routines - Grant Williams (1972)



TWO DIFFERENT DELTOID ROUTINES
 by Grant Williams (1972)


Of all the muscle groups of the upper body, the deltoids are the most important in my mind because of the width and thickness that they lend to the upper body when well developed. Could you possibly imagine Bill Pearl without his gigantic delts? If you can, you will see in your mind's eye a physique that is considerably less impressive than what is currently the best build in the universe. By the same token, I can think of several also-ran bodybuilders who would be on the top of the heap today if they could pack on a little more deltoid muscle. 

Anatomically, the deltoid is a rather complicated muscle that can move the arm in many directijons. This triangular shaped cap over the point of the shoulder takes its name from the Greek letter delta. It has three sections (or heads) that help move the arms in basically three directions. 

The frontal section is called the anterior head of the deltoid and it is brought into use in moving the arms from a crucifix position toe the point of hands touching in front of the body. A second function is to move the arms overhead from the sides when the palms are facing forward. From these examples you can see that bench pressing and overhead pressing strongly influence this anterior head of the deltoid.

The central section of the deltoid is called the lateral or medial (side) head of the muscle. This is the head that adds the most width to the upper body, and it is activated when raising the arms from the sides overhead with the palms facing down. The best exercise for developing this head of the delts is any one of the various forms of side lateral raises.

The rear section of this muscle is called the posterior head of the deltoid. Its main function is to move the arms to the rear, both when they are at the sides and when they are straight out in crucifix fashion. Two of the best exercises for this section of the delt are bentover rowing and the bentover lateral raise.   

From the foregoing discussion please do not get the idea that the only way to exercise a particular section of the deltoid is to do one of the suggested exercises. The deltoids are such complicated muscles that every upper body exercise that you do will stimulate them to some degree. I am merely stating the most direct exercise for each section. For complete development you should take one of the following routines and work very hard on the listed exercises. You should do the suggested number of sets and should always try to exceed the number or repetitions that you think you can do.

As far as repetitions are concerned, most the the big guys use fairly low reps in building their deltoids. While they may use from 8 to 20 reps for other parts of the body, most stick from 4 to 8 reps for the delts.


Reg Park has been noted for his fantastic deltoids for over 20 years now and he generally does sets of 4 to 6 reps in all his pressing and lateral raise movements. So, give low reps a try, and if they do not work for you then start experimenting with higher repetitions.

Regardless of what rep scheme you intend to use, be very sure to thoroughly warm up the deltoid region before using heavier weights. Two or three sets of pressing alternated with upright rowing with light weights should do the trick. Then, as soon as you have worked up to a light sweat, you are ready to tackle one of the following routines. 


Routine One

The first routine is a quickie. It consists of  only nine sets, and for best results you will need to finish the entire schedule in 12 minutes or less. Do the following three exercises in series fashion, one right after the other, three complete series:

Standing Lateral Raise
Press Behind Neck
Bentover Lateral Raise

Done in this order the exercises will thoroughly work all three heads of the deltoid in record time. You will find the presses to be much harder than usual because the deltoid will already be somewhat fatigued by the laterals. 

Thanks to Robert Kennedy in 1968 are in order - 

You will soon find (probably the next day when you find how sore the muscles are) that this routine will really get at the deep muscle fibers. Do all nine sets fast as you can, and be sure you rest only after each series and not between exercises. If you are not leaving sweat on the gym floor after this routine you aren't working hard enough.


Routine Two 

 The second routine is for the more advanced man who has a lot of time in which to train. The routine consists of 20 sets that will take about an hour to perform, but which will pump up the deltoids like never before. Perform low reps in the pressing and rowing movements, and slightly higher repetitions in the lateral raises.

The first exercise is the Press Behind Neck. Both Bill Pearl and Reg Park have done some mighty heavy weights in this exercise, so you can see that if you want big delts you will need to add weight as often as possible. Most of the bigger fellows do 5 sets of 5 with at least 200 pounds. You should do 5 sets with as much weight a you can handle, even if it is only 100 pounds to start with. Take your time between sets and work hard to up that poundage. 

The second exercise is the Upright Rowing movement. This is an old favorite for both deltoid and trapezius development. Use a relatively narrow grip and be sure to resist the weight on the way down, as you will be getting as much benefit from the downward movement as from the upward part of the exercise. You should also use maximum weight in this movement for 5 sets of 5 reps. Many of the more developed men use 175 pounds in this movement, using very strict form. 

The last two exercises should be done in alternate set fashion. These are the Front Raise with a barbell and the Bentover Lateral Raise with dumbbells. Do these exercises strictly and for 5 sets of 8 to 12 reps each. Alternate between the two, taking rest breaks between each set, not in superset style. 

That is the whole routine. As mentioned, it should take about an hour to complete the 20 sets, which gives you an idea of how long to rest between sets. If you're finishing much quicker than that you're not using heavy enough weights. 

I would suggest that you do this routine no more than twice a week. I usually work my delts with my arms when I am on a split routine. Personally, however, I prefer to do the whole body three times each week, so I usually do the quickie routine twice a week and the second routine once, on a day when I have available time. Regardless of what routine you do choose or how you decide to possibly combine the two each week, work as hard as you can for at least six weeks before going back to your usual shoulder training. After a while come back to these routines and over the period of several months see what kind of gains you can accumulate.

Monday, June 27, 2016

Massive Arms for You, Part Six - Joe Weider (1956)





DUMBBELL AND LEVERAGE BELL EXERCISES FOR THE FOREARMS



1) Standing Wrist Twist:
 - for maximum flushing action.

Stand erect and hold a dumbbell in either hand, arms straight at the sides, weights at the thighs. The palms of the hands should be facing each other. Now, curl the weights up and in. Permit wrists to drop back to normal position and then twist them away from the body. Continue twisting the wrists back and forth quite rapidly and after 15 repetitions or so you should feel a burning sensation in the forearms and the area will be very pumped up.

Don't be afraid to work the forearms hard and to perform rather high repetitions in exercises for them. The forearms thrive on tough work and grow most quickly when trained vigorously.

Besides the palms in style you can also perform some wrist twisting with palms forward and also with palms facing the rear. You will find the exercise even more severe, and often more productive, especially in very stubborn cases of forearm growth, if you perform the wrist twist exercise directly after performing a set of dumbbell curls. While the curls are essentially a biceps exercise they do work the forearms to some extent, and merely having to hold onto the dumbbells while performing the curls tires the forearms considerably. Then, if you immediately perform the wrist twist exercise your forearms will get double work.

Still another variation of the wrist twisting exercise is to hold the dumbbells the same as mentioned above, but, instead of twisting the wrist back and forth, twist it up and down, to the front and to the back.

A final variation, and a very good one, is to start again as mentioned originally, but this time keep your wrists stiffened and merely circle the weight around to one side as far as it will go, and then to the other side as far is it can go. You will naturally have to move the entire forearm to do this as well as the upper arm, but the circle exercise develops the forearm area close to the elbow, and it is an important one.

To cheat in any of these exercises you use a little swing from the arms to supply a bit of motion to the weight and that permits you to handle heavier poundages and to perform more repetitions.


2) Zottman Curl:
 - for a balanced development between the biceps and the forearms.

This exercise gets its name from George Zottman, an oldtime strength performer and all around athlete.

More here:
http://ditillo2.blogspot.ca/2009/05/george-zottman-mac-batchelor.html

It is an important exercise for preserving a fine balance between the forearm and the biceps. To perform the exercise, stand erect, holding a dumbbell in each hand at the thighs, the palms of the hands facing each other. Now, curl one dumbbell in a circular motion until it reaches the center of the chest (this is the same as the front of chest curl mentioned earlier). Once the dumbbell reaches this position you twist the palm to the front and start lowering the weight off to the side. As you lower the weight you begin to curl the weight in the opposite hand to the center of the chest. This exercise should be performed in a very rhythmic fashion.

To cheat in this exercise you use a swing and a lean-back as needed to help you use more weight and get more repetitions.


3) Shoulder Height Wrist Twist:
 - for flushing up the belly portion of the forearm.

Stand erect holding a pair of dumbbells at the shoulders as in a front double biceps pose, palms facing the front. Now, permit the wrist to bend forward, without moving the upper arm, so that the forearms will assume a goose neck formation. Still without moving the arms and restricting the action entirely to the wrists, draw the weights up and then back as far as they will go. Continue this wrist twisting front and back until the forearms are fully flushed up. You can also hold the palms facing each other and perform the wrist twisting motion in this position, and you can circle the weights from the wrists the same as you did in the standing wrist twist exercise.

To cheat in this exercise you permit just a little forearm movement. You move the entire forearm a fraction of an inch either front or back or side to side and this gives a good start to the weight, permitting the use of heavier poundages and/or more repetitions.


4) Goose Neck Curl:
 - another exercise for bulking up the body of the forearms.

To start this exercise bend forward and grasp a dumbbell in one hand, palm of the hand facing the rear. Now, curl the weight up to the shoulder and while doing do permit the wrist to bend forward, producing a goose neck formation of the forearm. Lower the weight to arm's stretch toward the ground and repeat. Perform the full number of repetitions with one arm and then with the other. To cheat, swing weights slightly.


5) Reverse Dumbbell Curl:
 - for ligament power.

Stand erect and hold a pair of dumbbells at the thighs, palms facing the rear. Now, keep the wrists stiff and curl the weights to the shoulders. Lower to the starting position and repeat.

Besides the hands together version you can also perform this exercise in an alternate manner, first curling one weight and then when lowering this weight you curl the other.

To cheat, use a little swing and body motion which permits the use of heavier weights.


6) Holding Heavy Dumbbells in Hands:
 - for giving the grip terrific power.

For best results this exercise is performed with thick handled dumbbells. You can have a special dumbbell sleeve made, cut from 2 inch diameter tubing to fit in the center of the dumbbell, or else you can wrap adhesive tape about the bar until it is of the desired thickness. Of the two, the sleeve is more practical since it can be quickly removed and the dumbbell can then be used for other exercises where the standard sized grip is preferable.

The exercise is simple. All you do is load up the dumbbells to a rather heavy weight and then lift them off the ground, permitting them to hang at the sides. If the grip is 2 inch diameter as suggested, you won't be able to handle too much weight at first and you will have to grip tightly to keep the dumbbells from falling out of your grasp.

Merely hold the dumbbells at arms length at the sides until the grip gives out. Do not rest the dumbbells against the thighs for this would lessen the strain on your grip. Hold them free from the sides and then grit your teeth and hang onto them for as long as you can. Keep a record of how long you hold the dumbbells from workout to workout and when you can hold any weight for more than two minutes add some poundage. There is no way to cheat in this exercise. You have to do it in the manner explained for full benefit.


7) Knee Wrist Twist:
 - for flushing up the forearms.

Sit on a flat exercise bench and hold a dumbbell in one hand, palm facing up, forearm resting along the thigh, wrist and hand extending beyond the knee. Permit the wrist to drop down. Now, curl the wrist back up and back as far as possible, maintaining the forearm on the knee. Lower the wrist again and repeat until the forearm is fully flushed up. Repeat the exercise with the opposite hand.

Besides the palms up position this same exercise can be performed with the palm facing down and the palm facing in. To cheat in this exercise perform the movement rather quickly, and this will permit more repetitions and the use of a heavier weight.


8) Pinch Grip:
 - for strengthening the fingers.

There are many variations of the pinch grip exercise and I will explain some of them now. The pinch grip does not necessarily bulk up the forearms, but it does toughen the grip and generally strengthen your gripping power. Such strength is very helpful when handling heavy weights in curls and other exercises and therefore you should not neglect the pinch grip exercises in your routines.

The simplest version is to merely lift one or two barbell plated, sandwiched together, and allow them to hang at arms' length at the sides. Hold the weight as long as you can, until the grip gives out, the same as you did when you held the heavy dumbbells at the sides.

Once your fingers toughen up you can practice cleaning heavy plates to the shoulder using the pinch grip. You can also practice curls with the palms facing in, and the goose neck curl, while employing the pinch grip.

You can perform the pinch grip exercises with either two hands together, one hand at a time, and in the various curling movements you can exercise alternately if you prefer.

Almost any of the curling exercises and most of the wrist twisting exercises explained in this book in which dumbbells can be used can be performed holding a barbell plate in the hands and doing the same exercise pinch grip style. You won't be able to handle too much weight, and in some cases the exercises may feel awkward, but you can be sure that pinch gripping will work wonders with your finger strength. You cannot cheat in this exercise, you must perform all versions in good form.


9) Middle Finger Dumbbell Lift:
 - for finger power.

Lifting weights using only the middle finger of each hand gives that naturally strong digit almost superhuman power. With practice you will be able to lift almost as much with your middle finger as with your whole hand, and when you can, your grip will be very strong.

The simplest version is to merely hold a dumbbell in each hand at the side with the middle finger only. However, once you get used to this you can try to curl the dumbbells and even press them above the head using the middle finger grip. And the thinner the bar you use the more you will be able to lift off the ground. You can perform curls, wrist twists, presses and almost every exercise you can perform with dumbbells, and using the middle finger grip will add variety to your workouts.

To cheat, once your fingers are toughened up, follow the cheating rules for whatever version of the middle finger exercise you are performing, as outlined in the dumbbell style.


10) Barbell Plate Finger Lift:
 - for strengthening each finger separately.

In most barbell and dumbbell exercises the middle and index fingers do most of the gripping work. While the thumb does encircle the bar, it actually contributes only slightly to the gripping power, and the pinkie and second finger are relatively unimportant.

It is essential, nevertheless, for the arm enthusiast to give attention to all fingers of his hand, and one way to do this is to perform the barbell plate finger lift.

The exercise is simple, yet very effective. Merely place your hand palm up on a flat exercise bench. Then place a light barbell plate over the hand. Raise the plate up using only one finger at a time. To exercise the thumb you place the plate on that finger entirely. You will soon learn which your stronger and weaker fingers are, and you will use lighter or heavier weights according to their respective strengths.

You can also perform this exercise with palms facing down, and this version is a fine strengthener too. There is no way you can cheat in this exercise. Just try to use as much weight as you can and if you succeed in lifting it with one finger, you can be sure you are doing the exercise correctly.


LEVERAGE BELL FOREARM EXERCISES

1) Leverage Bell Curl:
 - for great forearm and finger power.

A leverage bell is merely a dumbbell with weights loaded only on one end. It is particularly effective in forearm work, since the leverage principle places a strong strain on the gripping and forearm power, producing great results.

It is best to exercise each arm separately, since the leverage bell exercises require a lot of concentration. To perform the leverage bell curl, merely hold a leverage bell (with the weighted end facing front) in one hand with the arm extended down and at the side. Now, keeping the wrist stiff curl the bell to the shoulder the same as you would do in the regular dumbbell curl. The palm should be facing in, however, it can also be performed with the palm facing the front, as well as to the rear as in the reverse curl. Lower the weight to the thigh and repeat, performing the same number of repetitions with each arm.

To cheat, swing the bell slightly and this will permit the handling of heavier weights.


2) Leverage Bell Curl with Weight to the Rear:
 - for greater action in the belly of the forearm than in the standard, weight to the front leverage bell variety.

The only difference between this exercise and the preceding one is that the weighted end of the leverage bell is pointed to the rear instead of to the front. This placement of the weighted end throws greater strain on the belly, or the meaty middle section of the forearm. Start as mentioned above, and curl the weight to the shoulder. You can also hold the palm of the hand to the front, and to the rear. To cheat, as in the previous exercise, you swing slightly.


3) Leverage Bell Goose Neck Curl:
 - for bulking up the middle section of the forearm.

Bend forward and lift a leverage bell from the ground, the weighted end facing the front, the palm of the hand facing in. Now, maintaining a bent forward position curl the weight and permit the wrist to bend forward into a goose neck formation. Lower the weight to arm's stretch toward the ground and perform an equal number of repetitions with each hand.

To cheat, swing the bell slightly.


4) Lever Bell Standing Wrist Twist:
 - for flushing up the forearm.

Hold a leverage bell, weighted end to the front and pointed well down toward the ground. Now, with movement at the wrist only raise the weighted end of the bell up as high as possible. Lower and repeat the same number of repetitions with each hand.

You can also perform this same exercise with the weighted end of the leverage bell to the rear, instead of to the front, and you can turn your palm to the front, and the back as well, but in whatever position you hold your hand you must always twist the wrist from side to side so that the weighted end of the leverage bell rises and then lowers.

You can also hold the leverage bell with the weighted end either to the front or to the rear, and then circle the weighted end from side to side. It is impractical to cheat in this exercise.


5) Leverage Bell Shoulder Height Circle:
 - for combined shoulder and forearm exercise.

Stand erect and hold a leverage bell in one hand, arm straight and extended to the side, weighted end extending beyond the hand. Maintaining this arm position, circle the leverage bell first in one direction and then in the other. To cheat in this exercise bend the elbow slightly, and lean well over to the opposite side, permitting the use of heavier weight.


6) Seated Leverage Bell Wrist Twist:
 - for flushing up the forearms.

Sit on a flat exercise bench, forearm resting along the thigh, hand and wrist extending beyond the knee. Hold a leverage bell in the hand, weighted end to the front, and weight pointed toward the floor, palm of the hand facing in. Now, keeping the forearm against the thigh, raise the weight up as high as possible. Lower and repeat. Perform the same number of repetitions with each hand.

You can also perform this exercise with the palm facing up, and twisting the wrist from right to left instead of up and down, and you can do it with the palm of the hand facing down, again twisting the wrist from right to left instead of up and down.

A final version is to hold the palm of the hand either in, up, or down, and then to circle the weighted end of the leverage bell either in a complete circle or else as far as it can go in one direction and then back again.

It is impossible to try to cheat in the wrist twist or the circling movement. Just make sure that you flush up the forearms well and you will be doing the exercises right.
 
 
 


Saturday, June 18, 2016

Massive Arms for You, Part Five - Joe Weider (1956)





Dumbbell Exercises for the Triceps Muscle

1) Standing Dumbbell Press:
 - for developing triceps, shoulders and upper back at one time.

The standing two arm dumbbell press is an elementary triceps exercise. It gives power and size to the triceps and teaches that muscle to work in harmony with the shoulders and upper back, which is important if the triceps are to function efficiently in physical activity.

The most common method of procedure is to stand erect, a dumbbell held in each hand, weights at the shoulders, palms facing in. From this position, both dumbbells are pressed together to arms' length above the head. There is little or no body motion allowed and the arms, back and shoulders carry the full load. The weights are then lowered back to the shoulders and pressed above head again.

A variation of this exercise is to perform the pressing with the palms of the hands facing the front, instead of in. This throws a slightly different action on the triceps and it should be practiced from time to time.

A final variation, and it can be practiced with the palms facing in as well as out, is the start with the elbows pointed directly out to each side, the upper arms parallel with the ground. Then, the weights are pressed to arms' length from that position and lowered only until the elbows are again parallel to the ground. Once that position is reached the dumbbells are pressed to arms' length again. This variation restricts the action more completely to the triceps, for the shoulders do not come into as much play, and it also eliminated the slight rest period that is possible when holding the weights at the shoulders with elbows at the side, as the first version explained. The 'elbows out' version does possess unusual triceps developmental possibilities and it should not be neglected.

To cheat in any of these 'arms together' dumbbell pressing exercises, you use a bit of body motion to start the dumbbell on its ride up and you also bend back a bit to get past the sticking point of the exercise. Some bodybuilders cheat by lowering the dumbbells rather quickly and bouncing the elbows off the sides, getting a good start this way. But this is a rather dangerous practice since a dumbbell could easily strike the shoulder and cause physical damage. It is better to lower rather slowly and then, after the weights have come to a dead stop, cheat by body motion and a lean-back.

The alternate dumbbell press is another variety of this same general exercise, and because more weight can be handled in this than in the 'arms together' style, it often builds stronger, larger triceps. You start as in the regular two dumbbell press, but instead of pressing the dumbbells together you press only one above the head. As you lower this dumbbell you press the other to above the head and continue alternately pressing and lowering the dumbbells until you have completed the full number of repetitions with each arm.

The alternate dumbbell press can be performed with palms facing in, palms facing out, with elbows pointed out to the sides, parallel to the ground, or else in the standard version, starting with weights at the shoulders and elbows pressed down at the sides.

To cheat in the alternate dumbbell press you see-saw the body, bending at the waist to the opposite side of the arm that is pressing the weight. You can get a lot of rhythm and snap into the see-saw cheating style and handle really heavy weights.

Besides the 'arms together' and the 'alternate' versions of the dumbbell press, you can also perform it with one arm alone, taking a dumbbell in one hand and then performing your full number of presses with that arm. After a short rest you repeat the exercise with the opposite arm.

The palms in and palms out positions can be used, and you can also bend over to the opposite side when cheating in this exercise, permitting the use of tremendous poundages once you perfect your technique.


2) Seated Dumbbell Press:
 - for a more isolated triceps workout.

The standing dumbbell press and all its variations permit considerable body motion and flexibility of performance. And, while all champions perform some version of a standing press, often, to restrict the exercise action more locally to the triceps they do the exercise either seated on a flat exercise bench, or even seated on the floor.

The dumbbell are lifted to the shoulders, or else handed to you at the shoulders if you have two training partners to assist you, and then, while seated on a bench or on the floor you press the weight overhead. You can perform all the variations possible that are done standing with the seated style, but because it is harder to maintain balance and more difficult to cheat, you will not be able to use as heavy poundages. You will experience a more direct triceps action though, and therefore, you should not neglect the seated styles.


3) Standing Dumbbell Triceps Press:
 - a very direct action triceps exercise.

To start this exercise, press one dumbbell above your head. Hold the upper arm close to your ear and side of your face and lower the dumbbell behind the head. The elbow is raised high and the palm of the hand is facing front. Now, maintaining the elbow pointed high and the upper arm against the side of the head, extend the arm and lift the dumbbell to arm's length above the head. Lower and repeat, performing the full number of repetitions first with one arm and then with the other.

It is impractical to cheat in this exercise, for to do so would destroy some of its isolation action and lessen its benefit. Besides performing the exercise standing, it is equally effective when done seated.


4) Standing Two Arm One Dumbbell Triceps Press:
 - another isolation exercise, but one which also has a desirable pumping up effect.

While this exercise may appear to be merely a two arm version of the preceding one, in reality it produces a radically different effect. For, while it still incorporates all the good features of the one arm version, it also embodies a real pumping up and flushing feature which makes your triceps respond.

To perform the movement, place your hands under the plates at one end of a dumbbell. Raise the dumbbell with palms facing up, pressing against the plates, to arms' length above the head. Keep the upper arms close to the sides of the head, Now, keep the elbows pointed up and lower the dumbbell behind the head. Still keep the elbows pointed up and press the weight to arms' length above the head. Lower again and repeat.

Because the weight is evenly balanced between the two hands, it is possible to cheat in this exercise and from this cheating get the special pumping up benefit I mentioned. To cheat, you lower the weight rather quickly, but you keep it under control at all times. As it drops behind the head and the elbows are fully bent, if you lower the weight properly you will feel a slight bounce as soon as the weight is lowered fully behind the head. Use the tempo from this bounce to help you to raise the weight to arms' length again and you will be surprised at how much weight you will be able to handle. And, because you do the exercise more quickly and cheat in this manner, the triceps becomes very pumped up.

Besides the standing version you can also perform the seated style as explained in the one arm variety.


5) Flat Bench Dumbbell Press:
 - for triceps bulk and power.

Lie on a flat exercise bench and hold a dumbbell in each hand, weights at the shoulders, palms facing each other and elbows well down. Press the weights together to arms' length above the chest and then lower and repeat. Besides the palms facing each other position, you can also perform this exercise with the palms facing to the front, or towards the feet.

You can also perform the same exercise starting with the elbows pointed directly out to the sides, upper arms parallel to the ground and then press to arms' length with palms either facing each other or else to the front. You lower only until upper arms are parallel to the ground and no lower, and you keep the elbows pointed out at all times.

To cheat in the various styles of this exercise you lower the weight rather quickly and tense the upper back muscles, which will form a muscular shelf from which you can bounce the weights up and give them a start. You can also employ a bit of body motion, raising the upper body slightly off the exercise bench to give the weights a start, or else arching the body on the feet and upper back, depending on which cheating style suits you best and permits you to use more weight.

While some bodybuilders perform this exercise in an alternate style and some even practice it one arm at a time, experience has indicated to me that both these versions are impractical, since the weight seems to pull the body off balance and in this way limits the amount of weight that can be used. You can try either style if you want, and if you feel a direct triceps action from either or both, then include them from time to time in your triceps training.

If the bodybuilder does not have access to either a flat exercise bench or an incline bench, he can still perform most of the lying exercises directly on the floor, merely placing a cushion under his upper back to permit exercise freedom and range of motion somewhat. However, exercising on the floor does limit muscular action to a large extent and should only be used as an emergency measure until a flat and incline bench can be obtained.


6) Flat Bench Triceps Curl:
 - a direct-action triceps exercise.

Lie on a flat exercise bench and hold a dumbbell in each hand, weight raised to arms' length above the face. The palms of the hands should be facing each other. Now, while keeping the elbows pointed high, lower the weights together, behind the head. Raise the weight to the starting position, still keeping the elbows raised high, and repeat.

You can also perform this exercise with the palms facing the front instead of towards each other. And it can be performed on an incline bench as well as the flat bench. Since this is a very direct-action triceps exercise, cheating is impractical and the exercise should always be performed in good form


7) Flat Bench Triceps Curl with One Dumbbell in Two Hands:
 - another direct-action triceps exercise, but one which permits cheating and therefore more flushing of the triceps.

Lie on a flat exercise bench and raise a dumbbell above the head, holding it with both hands cupped under the plates, the same as in the standing two hands one dumbbell triceps press. Lower the weight behind the head and then press again to arms' length above the face. Note that the elbows are pointed directly up and that the upper arms are close to the sides of the face.

To cheat in this exercise you lower the weight rather quickly and when it reaches its lowest point with elbows fully bent, you will be able to obtain a bit of a muscle bounce which will help you to perform repetitions with heavier weights.

Besides the flat bench version of this exercise it can also be performed on an incline bench.


8) Bob Shealy Dumbbell Triceps Kick-Back:
 - a very severe triceps contracting exercise.

Start with dumbbells behind the head while lying on a flat bench. Now, shoot both dumbbells back to straight arms, draw the dumbbells to the starting position, and repeat. This exercise can be performed with palms facing each other, palms facing up, and palms facing down, and each variation develops the triceps from a slightly different angle. To cheat in this exercise perform the exercise rather quickly and arch up onto the shoulders to give you greater power.


9) Rear Extension Triceps Exercise:
 - to give tremendous definition to triceps muscle.

Bend forward while standing and hold a dumbbell in one arm, weight raised close to the chest and elbow pulled well back. The palm of the hand is facing the front. Now, without altering the position of the upper arm, extend the dumbbell to the rear, to arms' length behind the body and mentally contract the triceps while doing so. Bend at the elbow and return the dumbbell to the starting position again and repeat. Perform the same number of repetitions with each arm.

Besides the palm front position this exercise can also be done with the palm facing the body and also facing the rear. While the single arm version as explained above is preferred by most bodybuilders, it is practical to perform this same exercise with both arms together, holding a dumbbell in the starting position in each hand and then simultaneously extending them to the rear.

To cheat in this exercise you use a bit of body motion and swing the weights back to the locked postion and this permits the use of heavier weights.

There is another version of this same exercise which some bodybuilders like. It can only be performed in the arms together style and here is how it is done. The bent over body position is the same, and the dumbbells are both raised up close to the chest. However, instead of the elbows being pointed to the rear, they are pointed directly out to the sides. The weights are then extended to the sides, instead of back. You can perform this exercise with palms facing each other as well as palms facing the rear.

A final, and slightly different version of this extension exercise, one which often proves very effective is performed as follows. Bend forward from the waist, just as in the regular style which has been explained. Grasp a dumbbell in each hand, but permit the weights to hang at full stretch toward the floor. The position you are to assume is similar to the start of the two arm dumbbell row. Now, keeping the elbows absolutely stiff, raise the weights together to the rear and up as far as possible. You can perform this exercise with palms facing front, towards each other, or to the rear. To cheat, you swing the bells slightly at the start of the exercise to give them momentum.


10) Lying Face Down Flat Bench Extension Exercise:
 - a general summary of how extension exercises can be performed lying face down on a flat bench.

The majority of standing triceps extension exercises can be performed while lying face down on a flat exercise bench. In the flat bench bent arm rear extension you start with the weights pulled up toward the chest and elbows raised high. You then extend the dumbbells back to arms' length, tensing the triceps while doing so. To save space I will not go into detail explaining all the varieties possible, for you can personally test all those already explained for the standing, bent over version, and those which seem to work effectively for you can be included from time to time in your workouts.

And what is true of the flat exercise bench is true also of the incline bench. You rest your body, face forward on an incline bench and then perform the various types of triceps extension movements.


11) Bent Forward Dumbbell KickBack:
 - for real power and contractile triceps strength.


Bend forward and hold a dumbbell in each hand, palms facing the body, weights resting on the lower back hip area. Now, quickly kick back the dumbbells to straight arms to the rear of the body. Draw the dumbbells back to the starting position and repeat.

To cheat in this exercise, bend forward more than at right angles with the ground and you will be able to handle heavier poundages.

Besides the palms facing the body version, you can also perform the exercise with palms facing each other, and palms facing the rear.


12) One Dumbbell Jerk:
 - for tremendous triceps power.

Raise one dumbbell to the shoulder, and rest the lifting arm elbow on the hip, palm of the hand facing the shoulder. Now bend the knees slightly and then straighten them quickly and while doing so shove the weight above the head to arm's length.

Use both hands to lower the weight to the shoulder again and repeat. Perform this exercise with each hand, trying to use the same weight and to perform the same number of repetitions with each. Do not worry about lifting technique. Merely jerk the weight to arm's length in whatever style suits you best. Just as long as you jerk more than you can press, you will be obtaining benefit from the movement.

Besides the one arm at a time version, you can also jerk two dumbbells above the head at the same time. However, you should have two assistants to help you raise the weights to the shoulders and to also watch you in the event that you lose control of the weights either when jerking above the head or lowering back to the shoulders.

The only way you can cheat in this exercise is to put more power into your jerk. The more you perfect the jerk and learn how to coordinate your leg power with your arms. the more weight you will be able to handle in either the one arm or two arm styles.


13) Dumbbell Pressout:
 - for great ligament power and lockout strength.

This exercise is very similar to the barbell version which was explained in the section devoted to barbell triceps exercises. To perform it, you raise two heavy dumbbells to the shoulders and jerk them above the head. You now lower the weights only a few inches, then press the weights to arms' length again and once more lower only a few inches and then press out again. You may need two assistants to help you to get the weights to arms' length above the head as you progress in this exercise, for soon you will be able to lower very heavy weights a few inches and lock them out again; more weight than you will be able to lift unassisted to arms' length above the head.

To cheat in this exercise set your body well back, bending at the lower back, and this will give you a secure support, and permit the handling of heavier poundages.


14) Lying Side Press:
 - for working the triceps and latissimus dorsi muscles together.

Lie on your side on a flat bench, propped up on one elbow, holding a dumbbell in the other hand at the shoulder. The palm of your hand is facing in, or towards your body. Now, press the weight to arm's length above the body. Lower to the starting position and repeat. Because of the body placement and the manner in which the weight is pressed to arm's length, little or no cheating is possible. You must perform the exercise in good style or else you will lose control of the weight which should of course be avoided. Naturally, you will perform the exercise with each arm.







Thursday, June 16, 2016

The Good Dumbbell System of Training, Courses 3 and 4 - Harry L. Good (1937)







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THE GOOD DUMBBELL SYSTEM OF TRAINING
Courses Three and Four
by Harry L. Good (1937)


See here for more, including introductory material:






"Good" Dumbbell Course No. 3

1) Regular Two Arm Curl
Stand erect holding a dumbbell in either hand, arms hanging at the sides and palms facing the front. Start to curl the dumbbells until they reach the position shown in Figure 1, Course 3. Lower them and repeat. Inhale when curling the dumbbells to the shoulders and exhale when lowering them. 

When starting the curl, bend the hands upward to assist in curling, also making the exercise more beneficial to the forearm muscles. This exercise develops the biceps, forearms, wrists and hands. Perform from 5 to 10 repetitions. When the maximum number of repetitions has been reached, increase the weight of either dumbbell 5 pounds and start over again. 


2) Alternate Press, Seated
Bring a dumbbell in either hand to the shoulders and sit on a box or chair. Start by pressing the dumbbell in right hand overhead as shown in Figure 2, Course 3. Lower to the shoulder and, at the same time, press the dumbbell in the left hand overhead. Repeat the exercise, alternating. Inhale when pushing the dumbbell on one hand overhead, exhale when pushing the other overhead. This exercise develops the triceps, shoulders, muscles of the upper back and along the spine. Perform from 6 to 12 repetitions and when the maximum is reached, increase weight of either dumbbell 5 pounds and start over.


3) Two Arm Swing
Stand erect, a dumbbell in each hand, holding them at arm's length along the sides. Bend the legs slightly and the upper body forward, swinging the dumbbells backward as shown in Figure 3, Course 3. From this position begin the upward movement, keeping the arms straight. Straighten the legs in a "snappy" manner, throwing the upper body forward and up until the bells reach a position with the level of the head. Now lower the body by splitting the legs, one to the front and one to the rear. This throws the dumbbells in a position at arm's length overhead to complete the movement.( Do a continual movement until the desired number of repetitions is completed.) Lower dumbbells to position shown and repeat. Inhale when swinging dumbbells overhead and exhale when lowering.

This is a great all-around exercise and can be changed by placing the feet wide apart and lowering the dumbbells between the legs, and from that position, swing them overhead. Another method is to place the dumbbells on the floor at the sides of the body at the completion of every repetition. Perform only one of these positions during one exercise period until each is used. Perform from 5 to 10 repetitions. When maximum is reached, increase weight of each dumbbell 5 pounds and start over.


4) Side Exercise Holding Dumbbell Overhead
Grasp a dumbbell in right hand and bring it to the shoulder and then jerk it overhead. Holding it overhead, place feet about 24 inches apart. Now begin the exercise by bending the left leg (keep the right leg straight) until the left hand touches floor (Figure 4, Course 3). Come to erect position and repeat. Always remember to keep eyes fixed on the dumbbell overhead to aid in balancing it. Be sure to keep the leg on the side of the lifting arm straight throughout entire exercise. Inhale when coming to erect position, exhale when lowering. This develops muscles at the side, small of back and the front of the mid-section. Perform from 5 to 10 times with either arm. When maximum has been reached, increase weight 5 or 10 pounds.


5) Two Arm Press, While Squatting
Standing erect, hold a dumbbell in either hand at the shoulders, placing feet about 8 inches apart, toes pointing outward. Begin the exercise by pushing both dumbbells overhead at the same time, lowering the body into deep knee bend on toes as in Figure 5, Course 3. While coming to the erect position, lower dumbbells to shoulders. Repeat.

This is a great exercise but hard to perform at first. It will become easier with practice. It can be varied by holding dumbbells overhead throughout entire exercise. Perform from 5 to 10 repetitions. When maximum number of repetitions has been reached, increase weight of either dumbbell 5 pounds and start over again.


6) Walking Calf Exercise
Grasp a dumbbell in either hand and hold them at arms' length at the side. Now raise on the toes as in Figure 6, Course 3, then walk in all possible directions - forward, backward and sideways. Do not bend the knees and do keep on toes as high as possible throughout the entire exercise. This develops calf muscles and the arches of the feet. Walk around until calves are very tired. Rest and repeat if much calf development is desired. Increase weight 5 or 10 pounds at a time. Do not use weights that will prevent you from holding the raised position.

7) One-Legged Deadlift Exercise
Grasp a dumbbell in either hand and stand erect. Holding dumbbells at the sides, balance the body on one foot. Now lower the dumbbells to the floor in front of the body by bending the knee - also bending the upper body forward until in the position shown in Figure 7, Course 3. Come to the erect position and repeat. Inhale when lowering, exhale when lowered, inhale when coming to erect position, exhale when erect.

This exercise is a leg developer, also good for development of small of the back. Be sure to perform the exercise with one leg, although some assistance in balancing with the other may be necessary at times. Perform the exercise with either leg from 6 to 12 times. When maximum number is reached, increase the weight of each dumbbell 5 pounds and start over again.


8) Wrestler's Bridge Exercise 
Lie flat on the back with the dumbbells on the floor. Grasp the dumbbells and bring them to arm's length. Then bend the knees and bring the feet as far as possible toward the buttocks and at the same time raise buttocks off the floor, placing feet apart as shown. Begin the exercise by raising the shoulders off the floor, using neck strength alone until the position shown in Figure 8, Course 3 is reached. Lower shoulders to the floor and repeat the exercise. Be sure to perform the entire exercise with a steady movement as a "jerky" manner could cause a "crick" in the neck.

Inhale when raising the body and exhale when lowering. This exercise develops the muscles of the neck and upper back, greatly improving the appearance of the neck. Perform from 6 to 12 times. When maximum number of repetitions as been reached, increase weight of each dumbbell 5 or 10 pounds and start over again.


9) Dumbbell Bent Press Exercise
Pull a dumbbell to the shoulder with the right hand and allow one end to touch the shoulder, as shown in Figure 9, Course 3. Bending to the left with the right upper arm resting against the upper right back muscles, hold the dumbbell with the forearm straight up and down. While in this position, be sure that the right leg is straight, toes pointing forward and that the left knee is bend slightly. Now place the palm of the left hand on the thigh just above the knee as shown in Figure 9, Course 3. Notice the position of the feet.

Now start to press the dumbbell overhead by bending toward the left and when bent halfway over, bend the body more toward the front and down. At this stage of the exercise the left leg has been bent to a great extent and the left arm is also bent by sliding it down along the thigh until the upper arm rests against the thigh thus assisting in supporting the upper body. The left forearm could rest on the thigh above the knee instead of having it slide down as mentioned above. While the body is bent in this position, the dumbbell in the right hand is almost moved in a position at arm's length overhead.

The movement is completed by bending the right leg and straightening the arm. After the dumbbell is pushed at arm's length come to the erect position by lowering the dumbbell gradually to the side . . . repeat the exercise.

Inhale when pushing dumbbell overhead, exhale when overhead, inhale when lowering, exhale when lowered. This exercise develops the triceps, the muscles of the sides and the entire back. Do this exercise from 5 to 10 times with either arm. When the maximum number has been reached, increase weight 10 pounds and start over.


10) Straddle Exercise on Object
Place two blocks on the floor about 14 inches apart (they should be about 6 inches in height), one dumbbell in front of blocks and the other in back. Stand with one foot on each block an lower into deep knee bend. Grasp one dumbbell in each hand, palms toward body, as shown in Figure 10, Course 3.

From this position come to standing position by straightening the legs and keeping the back as flat as possible (thus employing mainly leg muscles). From standing position lower to position illustrated in Figure 10, Course 3 and repeat the exercise.

Inhale when coming to erect position, exhale when erect, inhale when lowering, exhale when lowered. This exercise develops the thigh and buttocks. By changing hands when the repetitions are half completed the body will not be in the same position throughout the entire exercise.

This exercise can be performed on the floor but is less beneficial since the full squat is not performed. Perform from 8 to 14 times. When maximum is reached, increase the weight 10 pounds and start over again.


11) Special Triceps Exercise
Grasp a dumbbell in the right hand and then stand erect, feet about 24 inches apart. Now place left hand on the left knee and bring dumbbell in the right hand (keeping arm straight) backward and up while bending the left arm and the body to the left and slightly forward. This brings the dumbbell into the position shown in Figure 11, Course 3.

Lower the dumbbell to the thigh while straightening the body and repeat. Inhale when bringing the dumbbell to overhead position and exhale when lowering it. Notice that the leg on the side of the lifting arm as well as the lifting arm are kept straight throughout the exercise.

This exercise is a developer of the triceps, the muscles on the tip of the shoulder an also the side muscles (abdominal and back). Perform the exercise 5 to 10 times with each arm. When the maximum number of repetitions has been reached, increase the weight 2.5 pounds and start over again.


12) Lying Exercise for Shoulders
Lie flat on the floor with a dumbbell in each hand, knuckles down, as shown in Figure 12, Course 3. Now keep the upper arm stationary and raise the dumbbell in the right hand to the position shown. Lower an at the same time raise the dumbbell in the left hand in the same manner as dumbbell in right hand was raised. Repeat with right and left, alternating.

This exercise can also be performed by raising both arms at one time. Inhale and exhale the best you can. This exercise develops the deltoids. Perform exercise from 5 to 10 times. When the maximum number of repetitions has been reached, increase the weight of each dumbbell 2.5 pounds and start over again. 




"Good" Dumbbell Course No.4


1) One Arm Snatch
Place a dumbbell on the floor in front of the body. Now spread the feet about 18 inches apart, bend over and grasp the dumbbell in the right hand with palm toward the body. Place left hand on the left thigh above the knee with legs bent quite a lot, upper body leaning forward but quite flat.

Start pulling the dumbbell straight up in front of the body by straightening the legs and back in a "snappy" manner. Keep pulling the dumbbell high as possible - assist by straightening the left arm until it reaches a position in line with head then quickly lower body to position shown in Figure 1, Course 4. Stand erect, completing the forward movement. Lower the dumbbell to the floor and repeat.

Inhale when pulling the dumbbell to arm's length overhead and exhale when lowering. This exercise can be performed by splitting one leg to the rear and the other front instead of lowering the body into position shown. This exercise is known as the "one arm snatch" and develops speed, coordination of muscular development and lifting ability. The legs do most of the lifting but the entire body is exercised. Perform from 5 to 10 times with either arm. When the maximum number of repetitions has been reached, increase the weight 10 pounds and start over again.


2) Alternate Rowing Exercise
Place two dumbbells in front of the body, feet about 24 inches apart. Bend forward, keeping legs straight and grasp a dumbbell in either hand with knuckles to the front. Raise the dumbbells off the floor then pull one dumbbell up to the side of the neck as shown in Figure 2, Course 4. Lower it and at the same time pull the dumbbell in the opposite hand toward the neck. Lower and repeat, alternating.

When pulling the dumbbells toward the neck, pull them as high as possible, keeping the back as shown at all times. Notice the position of the elbows. Inhale when pulling one dumbbell toward the neck and exhale when pulling the other.

This exercise develops the large muscles of the broad of the back and also the neck muscles. Perform this exercise from 6 to 12 times with either arm. When the maximum number has been reached, increase the weight of each dumbbell 5 pounds and start over again.


3) Two Arm Press
Grasp a dumbbell in either hand and bring them to the shoulders, knuckles away from the body. Now stand erect with the dumbbells as shown in Figure 3, Course 4, the feet about 12 inches apart. Begin the exercise by pushing the dumbbells to arms' length overhead. Lower them to the shoulders and repeat.

Inhale when pushing the dumbbells overhead and exhale when lowering them to the shoulders. When performing the exercise throw the chest forward and the shoulders back. This exercise develops the triceps, back, and shoulder muscles. Perform the exercise 5 to 10 times, when the maximum has been reached increase the weight of each dumbbell 5 pounds and start over again.


4) Two Arm Snatch Exercise
Place the feet about 12 inches apart with a dumbbell in front of either foot, now stand erect. Fix the eyes on the dumbbells and then make a "dive" for them by bending the legs and the upper body and grasping one dumbbell in either hand, knuckles to the front. Pull the dumbbells up in front of the body by quickly straightening the legs and back, pull them as high as possible or until they reach a position about the height of the head. Then quickly lower the body by splitting one leg forward and one back as shown in Figure 4, Course 4. By splitting the legs, the dumbbells are thrown to arm's length overhead. When completing this movement, lower the dumbbells to the floor and repeat.

Inhale when raising the dumbbells overhead and exhale when lowering them. This exercise develops speed, coordination, lifting ability and is a wonderful all-round exercise. Perform this exercise from 5 to 10 times. When the maximum number has been reached, increase the weight of each dumbbell 5 pounds and start over again.


5) Abdominal Sit-up Exercise and Leg Raise
Lie on the floor with handle of a light dumbbell touching crown of the head. After the feet are placed securely under a bar or any suitable object, roll the dumbbell forward until it rests behind the neck. Begin the exercise by raising to the sitting position as shown in Figure 5, Course 4, being sure to lower the body forward and as far toward the feet as possible. Return to the lying position and repeat the exercise.

Remember not to bend the knees at any time during the exercise. This exercise must not be performed too fast nor too slow. Inhale when coming to the erect position, exhale when in the sitting position, inhale when lowering and exhale when lowered.

This exercise is a great developer of the small of the back, the mid-section and the muscles of the front of the thighs. Perform this exercise from 6 to 12 times. When the maximum number has been reached, increase the weight 2.5 pounds and start over again.

The following exercise should be performed after the sit-up exercise.

Having attached some light weight to the feet with a strap (or using health boots), lie down flat on the floor and place the hands with the knuckles up under the buttocks. Raise the legs up and then overhead. Lower the legs to the floor and repeat.

Always keep the legs straight. Inhale when raising the legs overhead, exhale when lowering. If the upper body has a tendency to raise off the floor, place a weight on the chest. This exercise develops the lower abdominal region and the muscles of the buttocks and hips.

Perform this exercise the same number of times as specified for the sit-up exercise and never increase the weight more than 2.5 pounds for either leg at a time. It may be necessary to perform this exercise without any weight for several weeks, then start with very light weights.


6) Two Arm Jerk Exercise
Place the dumbbells on the floor on either side of the body , bend over, quickly bending the knees and grasp a dumbbell in either hand. Straighten up quickly, bringing the dumbbells to the shoulders by splitting one foot forward and the other back. Now stand erect, feet about 12 inches apart and hold the dumbbells at the shoulders as shown in Figure 3, Course 4.

Now quickly bend he knees slightly, keeping the upper body straight then straighten the legs quickly, jerking the dumbbells overhead by splitting as shown in Figure 6, Course 4. Lower the dumbbells to the floor and repeat. Inhale when bringing the dumbbells to the shoulders, exhale when holding them at the shoulder, inhale when jerking them overhead and exhale when overhead.

This is a wonderful exercise for the entire body and develops speed and lifting ability. Perform from 5 to 10 times. When the maximum number has been reached increase the weight of either dumbbell 5 pounds and start over again.


7) Lateral Raise, Bending Forward  
Grasp a dumbbell in either hand, now bend forward, placing the feet as shown in Figure 7, Course 4. With the dumbbells hanging at arm's length in front of the body, begin the exercise by keeping the arms straight and raising the dumbbells to the sides as shown. Hold them a second then lower to hanging position and repeat. Inhale when raising the dumbbells to the sides as shown and exhale when lowering.

This exercise develops the muscles of the shoulders and upper back. This exercise can also be performed alternating the movements of raising one arm while lowering the other. Perform this exercise 5 to 10 times. When the maximum number of repetitions has been reached, increase the weight of each dumbbell 2.5 pounds and start over again.


8) Deep Knee Bend on One Leg
Grasp a dumbbell in each hand and stand erect, holding them at the sides. Now raise one foot off the floor then begin to lower the body into the deep knee bend position shown in Figure 8, Course 4. Come to the erect position and repeat. Inhale when lowering, exhale when lowered, inhale when coming to the erect position, exhale when standing.

This exercise is a great developer of the leg muscles and requires practice to succeed in performing it without losing the balance. The exercise is most difficult when the leg that is not being exercises is held as shown while performing the exercise. Perform this exercise 5 to 8 times with either leg. When the maximum number of repetitions has been reached, increase the weight of each dumbbell 2.5 pounds and start over again.


9) Overhead Curl and Triceps Exercise
Grasp a dumbbell in either hand and stand in the position shown in Figure 9, Course 4, holding the dumbbells as shown. Now perform the exercise by straightening the left arm to the position of the right and lower the right arm into the position of the left, as shown. Repeat the movements, alternating. Always remember to keep the upper arms as shown when performing the movements.

Inhale and exhale as is best for the individual. This exercise is very good for the triceps. Perform it from 5 to 10 times with each arm. When the maximum number of repetitions has been reached increase the weight of each dumbbell 2.5 pounds, start over.


10) Two Arm Pushup
Having placed a weight on the back, get into the position shown in Figure 10, Course 4. Keeping the entire body straight, raise up by straightening the arms. Lower the body into the position shown and repeat. Inhale when raising the body and exhale when lowering. The best position for the dumbbells on which the hands are placed is slightly more than shoulder width apart. The feet can be placed in a higher position making the exercise more difficult, however, but more beneficial.

This exercise is a wonderful developer of the pectorals and triceps and also develops the muscles of the upper back, small of back, abdomen and thighs. Perform the exercise from 8 to 14 times. When the maximum has been reached, increase the weight 10 pounds and start over again.


11) Leg Curl
Attach weights to the feet (or use Health Boots) then lie down as shown in Figure 11, Course 4, placing the thighs on a raised object. Start the exercise by curling the weight on the right leg as shown. Lower the right leg and curl the weight on the left leg to the position of the right as shown. Repeat, alternating. Inhale and exhale as best possible.

This exercise can also be performed with one leg at a time while standing erect with the hands placed against a wall. Perform this from 6 to 12 times with either leg and when the maximum number of repetitions are completed, increase the weight of either boot 5 pounds and start over again.


12) Deltoid Exercise
Stand erect holding a dumbbell in either hand as shown in Figure 12, Course 4. From this position press the dumbbells to arm's length overhead, then lower to position shown and repeat. Inhale when pushing dumbbells overhead and exhale when lowering. When performing this exercise keep the body erect and be sure to lower the dumbbells into the position shown with the elbows away from the sides and in line with the shoulders.

This exercise develops the deltoids, triceps and the muscles of the back along the spine. Perform the exercise from 5 to 10 times. When the maximum number of repetitions has been reached, increase the weight of either dumbbell 5 pounds and start over again.

End.   


















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